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Colorful Wooden Calendar Blocks

Learn how to make a perpetual calendar out of wood with this fun DIY!

Colorful Wooden Calendar Blocks
Colorful Wooden Calendar Blocks
This image courtesy of sakuraofamerica.com

Make a chic DIY calendar to enjoy the whole year! This Colorful Wooden Calendar Blocks is a fabulous DIY craft tutorial that shows you how to make a calendar you can use every year. This simple calendar looks great on a desk or counter top. Complete with every day of the year, this homemade calendar is a colorful way to track the changing time. Craft this for your own calendar needs, or make it as a homemade gift; this would be an especially cute DIY gifts for new parents who can use these blocks as pretty props and time trackers in photos of their children. Get started today making this bold and beautiful day calendar!

MaterialsWood

Primary TechniquePainting

Easy

Project TypeMake a Project

Materials List

  • (2) 3 ½ blocks
  • 4 x 24 in basswood plank, cut into (2) 7 ½ x 4 in pieces & (2) 3 ¾ x 7 in pieces
  • Rectangle dowel, cut into (3) 1 x 7 in pieces
  • Washi or masking tape
  • Permapaque® markers
  • Gold Pentouch® marker

DIY Wooden Calendar

Step-By-Step Instructions

  1. Using two blocks that are 3 ½ inches square. To make the stand, use a 2 foot x 4 inch lightweight plank of basswood (bought at the craft store), cut into 4 pieces. The back piece and bottom piece need to be cut slightly larger than the width of your two blocks put together. Cut to 7 ½ inches. (Take into account the thickness of your wood; if your wood is thicker, you’ll need to cut your pieces a bit longer.)

  2. Use a quick-dry wood glue to adhere the back and bottom pieces at a 90 degree angle, with the back piece resting on top of the bottom piece.

  3. For the sides, cut two pieces to 3 ¾ inches, and adhered these on top of the bottom piece at a 90 degree angle.

  4. You’ll also need to cut 3 wood rectangles, which will have the names of the months. This project uses a 3-foot rectangle dowel (found at a local craft store for a couple dollars).  Cut to the same length as your two blocks put together. The width of all three rectangles put together should be about the same as your block, but it’s okay if the rectangles are slightly smaller.  This project's block is 3 ½ inches, and the rectangles are 1 inch by 7 inches.

  5. Now start decorating our blocks! Recommended: test out a few different mediums on a piece of scrap wood (This project uses Permapaque® markers. They have a beautiful finish that doesn’t look thick or streaky like paint, or bleed into the grain of the wood like regular markers. You can also add a little sparkle with a gold Pentouch® marker.

  6. Use washi tape or masking tape to get crisp straight lines. Wrap tape around the block at regular intervals. Then color in the blank areas with a Permapaque® marker. There’s practically zero dry time, so you can move on to the next side right away. Unlike paint, you don’t have to wait for my design to dry before removing the tape.

  7. Although Permapaque markers come in a variety of colors, you can keep it simple with a fresh palette of pink, yellow, and green, grounded with black. This project uses stripes on the first block, polka dots on the second, and a zig-zag chevron on the third. But you can draw whatever design you’d like.

  8. For this project, half of each block’s surface is colored. Add tape diagonally from corner to corner. Protect the side edges as well. The markers used for this project feature dual nibs, with one end being a point that’s good for detailed work, and the other being a chisel that’s useful for filling in large areas.

  9. Use the pink, yellow, and green for this, with the same colors on opposite sides of the cube. This ink goes on smoothly, with a matte finish that almost looks like a wash or stain. The lighter colors allow the wood grain to peek through, which is a really pretty effect.

  10. Now we’re ready to add numbers to the blocks. It’s important that we do this right, or we won’t have the correct  number combinations for each day of the month. On the first block, write a 5 on the top and a 0 on the opposite side, or bottom. Add 1, 2, 3, and 4 to the sides.

  11. On the second block, write 0 on the top, and 8 on the opposite side, or bottom. Add 1, 2, 6, and 7 to the sides. Note that 6 will pull double duty as a 9, so be sure that you write it in a style that’s legible in either orientation.

  12. Finally, we can write the names of the months on the blocks. Use the gold Pentouch®for this, then adding a shadow outline with the black Permapaque® marker. The first block will have the first 4 months, the second block the next 4, and the last block the final 4.

  13. To use your calendar, place the month rectangles in the bottom of the stand, with the current month facing out. Add the date blocks on top, rotating as needed each day.

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. This looks so easy but I know I will mess it up. I am not a wood worker at all but I may be able to reproduce the project using cardboard. Here goes nothing.

I really like this calendar idea. Every time I see a new desktop project, I jump all over it. I am running out of desk top space now but this project can be used daily.

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